mavaddat
mavaddat:


Eesha Khare is an American student and an inventor of a supercapacitor to replace conventional batteries in portable electronics, that charges faster and lasts for more charging cycles. Khare, an 18-year-old graduate of Lynbrook High School in California, demonstrated a electrochemical supercapacitor prototype that can be fully charged within 20 seconds. Her technology is expected to be scalable to power cell phones and even cars, with similar performance. Moreover, it holds the charge longer than other devices. Khare’s invention won her $50,000 in prize money at the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award held in Phoenix, Arizona.[2][3] She held her specialization in Nanochemistry responsible behind the invention. Afterwards, she got the attention of Google and other technological giants.[4]

Under the supervision of Dr. Yat Li at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz [1], she designed, synthesized, and characterized a novel core-shell nanorod electrode with hydrogenated TiO2 (H-TiO2) core and polyaniline shell, fabricated into a flexible solid-state device. Tests showed 238.5 Farads per gram, 20.1 Watt-hours per kilogram, 20540 Watts per kilogram, and only 32.5% capacitance loss over 10,000 charging cycles.[5]

mavaddat:

Eesha Khare is an American student and an inventor of a supercapacitor to replace conventional batteries in portable electronics, that charges faster and lasts for more charging cycles. Khare, an 18-year-old graduate of Lynbrook High School in Californiademonstrated a electrochemical supercapacitor prototype that can be fully charged within 20 seconds. Her technology is expected to be scalable to power cell phones and even cars, with similar performance. Moreover, it holds the charge longer than other devices. Khare’s invention won her $50,000 in prize money at the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award held in PhoenixArizona.[2][3] She held her specialization in Nanochemistry responsible behind the invention. Afterwards, she got the attention of Google and other technological giants.[4]

Under the supervision of Dr. Yat Li at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz [1], she designed, synthesized, and characterized a novel core-shell nanorod electrode with hydrogenated TiO2 (H-TiO2) core and polyaniline shell, fabricated into a flexible solid-state device. Tests showed 238.5 Farads per gram, 20.1 Watt-hours per kilogram, 20540 Watts per kilogram, and only 32.5% capacitance loss over 10,000 charging cycles.[5]

utaustin
utaustin:

UT Austin’s John Goodenough wins engineering’s highest honor for pioneering lithium-ion batteryThe National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will bestow John B. Goodenough of The University of Texas at Austin with the highest honor in the engineering profession for the groundbreaking creation of the lithium-ion battery. He is one of four recipients of this year’s Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering in recognition of their significant roles in developing the lithium-ion battery, which is used by millions of people around the world in devices such as cellphones, laptops, tablets, hearing aids, cameras, power tools and many other mobile electronics. Read more.

utaustin:

UT Austin’s John Goodenough wins engineering’s highest honor for pioneering lithium-ion battery

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will bestow John B. Goodenough of The University of Texas at Austin with the highest honor in the engineering profession for the groundbreaking creation of the lithium-ion battery. He is one of four recipients of this year’s Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering in recognition of their significant roles in developing the lithium-ion battery, which is used by millions of people around the world in devices such as cellphones, laptops, tablets, hearing aids, cameras, power tools and many other mobile electronics. Read more.

laboratoryequipment
laboratoryequipment:

Supercapacitor Stores Electricity on Silicon ChipsSolar cells that produce electricity day and night, not just when the sun is shining. Mobile phones with built-in power cells that recharge in seconds and work for weeks between charges.These are just two of the possibilities raised by a novel supercapacitor design invented by material scientists at Vanderbilt Univ. that is described in a paper published in Scientific Reports. It is the first supercapacitor that is made out of silicon so it can be built into a silicon chip along with the microelectronic circuitry that it powers. In fact, it should be possible to construct these power cells out of the excess silicon that exists in the current generation of solar cells, sensors, mobile phones and a variety of other electromechanical devices, providing a considerable cost savings.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/supercapacitor-stores-electricity-silicon-chips

#supercapcitors #energy #materials #nanotechnology

laboratoryequipment:

Supercapacitor Stores Electricity on Silicon Chips

Solar cells that produce electricity day and night, not just when the sun is shining. Mobile phones with built-in power cells that recharge in seconds and work for weeks between charges.

These are just two of the possibilities raised by a novel supercapacitor design invented by material scientists at Vanderbilt Univ. that is described in a paper published in Scientific Reports. It is the first supercapacitor that is made out of silicon so it can be built into a silicon chip along with the microelectronic circuitry that it powers. In fact, it should be possible to construct these power cells out of the excess silicon that exists in the current generation of solar cells, sensors, mobile phones and a variety of other electromechanical devices, providing a considerable cost savings.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/supercapacitor-stores-electricity-silicon-chips

#supercapcitors #energy #materials #nanotechnology

fastcodesign

fastcodesign:

2 Scientists Accidentally Discover A World-Changing Super Material

Since a pair of Russian scientists won the Nobel Prize for discoveringgraphene in 2002, scientists have raced to find a more efficient way to make it. Among them were Ric Kaner and Maher El-Kady, two UCLA scientists who were searching for a better way to manufacture the super-strong material when they accidentally happened upon another holy grail in the science community: an efficient, biodegradable battery-like device—technically speaking, a supercapacitor.

They had accidentally created a graphene supercapacitor, which charges more quickly (and with more power) than regular batteries, making it a potential candidate to power a future generation of super-efficient gadgets, cars, and systems.

Kaner describes the device as “like a battery, but charges and discharges 100 to 1,000 times faster.” He imagines charging an iPhone in 30 seconds, or fully charging an electric car in minutes.

Equally important are the supercapacitor’s environmental benefits: Unlike batteries, which contain toxic chemicals and metals, graphene is entirely biodegradable.

Here’s the full story.

#science #materialsengineer #lithium ion batteries #supercapcitors #graphene

smarterplanet
smarterplanet:

Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes
Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.
The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.
Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

smarterplanet:

Graphene Ultracapacitors Offer Blistering Performance and Charge in a Couple of Minutes

Researchers at the University of California are developing graphene supercapacitors that can charge and discharge in a couple of minutes. The ability to discharge in a couple of minutes means that they are extremely powerful. More importantly though, these researchers developed a technique for printing graphene supercapacitors using a DVD burner.

The researchers dissolved graphite oxide in water and heated it with a laser from a standard DVD burner to obtain flexible graphene sheets. These graphene sheets are one-atom thick, yet can hold a remarkable amount of energy, while being charged or discharged in very little time compared to standard batteries.

Ultracapacitors have tremendous advantages over typical lithium-ion batteries, some of which are of paramount importance to the adoption of electric cars, such as their ability to charge in as little as 1 second, and last 20 years (easily, and with very heavy usage).

joshbyard
joshbyard:

MIT and Harvard Engineers Use “DNA-Legos” To Construct Graphene Nanostructures
This news is a follow-up to an earlier post “Harvard Researchers Create Self-Assembling Nano Bricks Made of DNA.”
Engineers are now using  self-assembling DNA nanobricks as a scaffold to build nanostructures out of graphene.

The MIT and Harvard researchers are essentially taking these shapes and binding them to a graphene surface with a molecule called aminopyrine.
Once bound, the DNA is coated with a layer of silver, and then a layer of gold to stabilize it. The gold-covered DNA is then used as a mask for plasma lithography, where oxygen plasma burns away the graphene that isn’t covered. Finally, the DNA mask is washed away with sodium cyanide, leaving a piece of graphene that is an almost-perfect copy of the DNA template.
So far, the researchers have used this process — dubbed metallized DNA nanolithography — to create X and Y junctions, rings, and ribbons out of graphene.
Nanoribbons, which are simply very narrow strips of graphene, are of particular interest because they have a bandgap — a feature that graphene doesn’t normally possess. A bandgap means that these nanoribbons have semiconductive properties, which means they might one day be used in computer chips.
Graphene rings are also of interest, because they can be fashioned into quantum interference transistors — a new and not-well-understood transistor that connects three terminals to a ring, with the transistor’s gate being controlled by the flow of electrons around the ring.

(via MIT and Harvard engineers create graphene electronics with DNA-based lithography | ExtremeTech)

joshbyard:

MIT and Harvard Engineers Use “DNA-Legos” To Construct Graphene Nanostructures

This news is a follow-up to an earlier post “Harvard Researchers Create Self-Assembling Nano Bricks Made of DNA.”

Engineers are now using  self-assembling DNA nanobricks as a scaffold to build nanostructures out of graphene.

The MIT and Harvard researchers are essentially taking these shapes and binding them to a graphene surface with a molecule called aminopyrine.

Once bound, the DNA is coated with a layer of silver, and then a layer of gold to stabilize it. The gold-covered DNA is then used as a mask for plasma lithography, where oxygen plasma burns away the graphene that isn’t covered. Finally, the DNA mask is washed away with sodium cyanide, leaving a piece of graphene that is an almost-perfect copy of the DNA template.

So far, the researchers have used this process — dubbed metallized DNA nanolithography — to create X and Y junctions, rings, and ribbons out of graphene.

Nanoribbons, which are simply very narrow strips of graphene, are of particular interest because they have a bandgap — a feature that graphene doesn’t normally possess. A bandgap means that these nanoribbons have semiconductive properties, which means they might one day be used in computer chips.

Graphene rings are also of interest, because they can be fashioned into quantum interference transistors — a new and not-well-understood transistor that connects three terminals to a ring, with the transistor’s gate being controlled by the flow of electrons around the ring.

(via MIT and Harvard engineers create graphene electronics with DNA-based lithography | ExtremeTech)